Skip to Menu Skip to Content Skip to Footer

Nutritional calculators

Nutritional calculatorsNutritional calculators  Find out what is your daily required caloric intake based on your basal metabolic rate (BMR), your body mass index (BMI) or your body fat and the health risks associated with it  using the specific nutritional calculators.

Depression test

Depression testZung depression self assessment test , based on the Zung Self-Rating Scale, is a widely used depression screening tool that is recognized by physicians worldwide. Although designed as a screening tool, this depression test has been adapted to track also your score over time.

Metabolic type self test

Metabolic typingMetabolic type self test  A proper, "customized" diet has many benefits: painless weight loss, increased energy and improved health. The metabolic typing diet does just that. To find the right balance specifically for you between proteins and carbohydrates take the metabolic type self test.

Jung personality types

Jung personality typeFind out your personality type - your likes and dislikes, your likely career choices, your compatibility with others.
Jung personality types assessment test.

Nutritional content tables

Nutritional content tablesNutritional content tables    Find out how many calories, proteins, carbohydrates, cholesterol, vitamins and minerals your food contains. Either you are dieting to loose weight or cleanse your body, or you figured out what is your metabolic type and you need to know specific foods for your type, well, the nutritional content tables will provide you with the answer you need. Ref. USDA Nutrient Data Laboratory, SR20 / 2008  database.

Glycemic Index

Glycemic indexGlycemic Index and Glycemic Load tables The table provided herein is a compilation of various sources for most common foods. Sustained elevated blood sugar levels are known to trigger a plethora of health problems like diabetes type two, hearth disease and inflammation.

Click on the picture to access tool. Check the controls for more >>>

  • Previous
  • Next
  • Stop
  • Play
066_Democritus_thumbnail.jpg

Show Login

  • Forgot your password?
  • Forgot your username?
  • Create an account?

02 August 2011

Jung personality types

Jung personality types... with a twist

Carl JungCarl Gustav Jung (1875 - 1961)

Jung's personality type theory divides the psyche into three parts. The first is the ego, which Jung identifies with the conscious mind. Closely related is the personal unconscious, which includes anything which is not presently conscious, but can be. The personal unconscious is like most people's understanding of the unconscious in that it includes both memories that are easily brought to mind and those that have been suppressed for some reason. But it does not include the instincts that Freud would have it include.

But then Jung adds the part of the psyche that makes his theory stand out from all others: the collective unconscious. You could call it your "psychic inheritance." It is the reservoir of our experiences as a species, a kind of knowledge we are all born with. And yet we can never be directly conscious of it. It influences all of our experiences and behaviours, most especially the emotional ones, but we only know about it indirectly, by looking at those influences.

Katharine Briggs and her daughter Isabel Briggs Myers found Jung's types and functions so revealing of people's personalities that they decided to develop a paper-and-pencil test. It came to be called the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), and is one of the most popular, and most studied, tests around. On the basis of your answers, you are placed in one of sixteen types, with the understanding that some people might find themselves somewhere between two or three types.

What type you are says quite a bit about you - your likes and dislikes, your likely career choices, your compatibility with others, and so on. People tend to like it quite a bit. It has the unusual quality among personality tests of not being too judgmental: none of the types is terribly negative, nor are any overly positive. Rather than assessing how "crazy" you are, the "Jung-Myers-Briggs" personality test simply opens up your personality for exploration.

  • The test has four scales. Extroversion - Introversion (E-I) is the most important. Test researchers have found that about 75 % of the population is extroverted.
  • The next one is Sensing - Intuiting (S-N), with about 75 % of the population sensing.
  • The next is Thinking - Feeling (T-F). Although these are distributed evenly through the population, researchers have found that two-thirds of men are thinkers, while two-thirds of women are feelers. This might seem like stereotyping, but keep in mind that feeling and thinking are both valued equally by Jungians, and that one-third of men are feelers and one-third of women are thinkers. Note, though, that society does value thinking and feeling differently, and that feeling men and thinking women often have difficulties dealing with people's stereotyped expectations.
  • The last is Judging - Perceiving (J-P), not one of Jung's original dimensions. Myers and Briggs included this one in order to help determine which of a person's functions is superior. Generally, judging people are more careful, perhaps inhibited, in their lives. Perceiving people tend to be more spontaneous, sometimes careless. If you are an extrovert and a "J," you are a thinker or feeler, whichever is stronger. Extroverted and "P" means you are a senser or intuiter. On the other hand, an introvert with a high "J" score will be a senser or intuiter, while an introvert with a high "P" score will be a thinker or feeler. J and P are equally distributed in the population.

Each type is identified by four letters. The sixteen types are detailed below.

  1. ENFJ (Extroverted feeling with intuiting): These people are easy speakers. They tend to idealize their friends. They make good parents, but have a tendency to allow themselves to be used. They make good therapists, teachers, executives, and salespeople.
  2. ENFP (Extroverted intuiting with feeling): These people love novelty and surprises. They are big on emotions and expression. They are susceptible to muscle tension and tend to be hyper alert. They tend to feel self-conscious. They are good at sales, advertising, politics, and acting.
  3. ENTJ (Extroverted thinking with intuiting): In charge at home, they expect a lot from spouses and kids. They like organization and structure and tend to make good executives and administrators.
  4. ENTP (Extroverted intuiting with thinking): These are lively people, not humdrum or orderly. As mates, they are a little dangerous, especially economically. They are good at analysis and make good entrepreneurs. They do tend to play at oneupmanship.
  5. ESFJ (Extroverted feeling with sensing): These people like harmony. They tend to have strong shoulds and should-nots. They may be dependent, first on parents and later on spouses. They wear their hearts on their sleeves and excel in service occupations involving personal contact.
  6. ESFP (Extroverted sensing with feeling): Very generous and impulsive, they have a low tolerance for anxiety. They make good performers, they like public relations, and they love the phone. They should avoid scholarly pursuits, especially science.
  7. ESTJ (Extroverted thinking with sensing): These are responsible mates and parents and are loyal to the workplace. They are realistic, down-to-earth, orderly, and love tradition. They often find themselves joining civic clubs!
  8. ESTP (Extroverted sensing with thinking): These are action-oriented people, often sophisticated, sometimes ruthless - our "James Bonds." As mates, they are exciting and charming, but they have trouble with commitment. They make good promoters, entrepreneurs, and con artists.
  9. INFJ (Introverted intuiting with feeling): These are serious students and workers who really want to contribute. They are private and easily hurt. They make good spouses, but tend to be physically reserved. People often think they are psychic. They make good therapists, general practitioners, ministers, and so on.
  10. INFP (Introverted feeling with intuiting): These people are idealistic, self-sacrificing, and somewhat cool or reserved. They are very family and home oriented, but don't relax well. You find them in psychology, architecture, and religion, but never in business.
  11. INTJ (Introverted intuiting with thinking): These are the most independent of all types. They love logic and ideas and are drawn to scientific research. They can be rather single-minded, though.
  12. INTP (Introverted thinking with intuiting): Faithful, preoccupied, and forgetful, these are the bookworms. They tend to be very precise in their use of language. They are good at logic and math and make good philosophers and theoretical scientists, but not writers or salespeople.
  13. ISFJ (Introverted sensing with feeling): These people are service and work oriented. They may suffer from fatigue and tend to be attracted to troublemakers. They are good nurses, teachers, secretaries, general practitioners, librarians, middle managers, and housekeepers.
  14. ISFP (Introverted feeling with sensing): They are shy and retiring, are not talkative, but like sensuous action. They like painting, drawing, sculpting, composing, dancing - the arts generally - and they like nature. They are not big on commitment.
  15. ISTJ (Introverted sensing with thinking): These are dependable pillars of strength. They often try to reform their mates and other people. They make good bank examiners, auditors, accountants, tax examiners, supervisors in libraries and hospitals, business, home etc., and phys. ed. teachers, and boy or girl scouts!
  16. ISTP (Introverted thinking with sensing): These people are action-oriented and fearless, and crave excitement. They are impulsive and dangerous to stop. They often like tools, instruments, and weapons, and often become technical experts. They are not interested in communications and are often incorrectly diagnosed as dyslexic or hyperactive. They tend to do badly in school.

You can take an abbreviated test based on Jung theory with a Myers - Briggs twist here: Jung personality type self assessment test.

The test consists of only 56 questions in pretty good correlation with the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) assessment that consists of 125 questions.

Please understand that this test is only designed to provide a sense of what the Jung personality types mean, rather  than an accurate measure of your personality.

After all who knows you better than yourself ? ...

Comments (3)
disapointing
1 Sunday, 11 July 2010 16:35
pissenisse
do not like fucked up stupid jokes by ignorant americans who after all actually are ranked as the second most stupid land on our earth eat shit and die
Dear Disapointing
2 Saturday, 19 February 2011 22:10
Cairney
It would be great for you to know how to spell "disappointing" correctly. If you feel the need to insult, you should learn to spell correctly first. Also might help you with your future. Just some food for thought :)

As for the test.....I love taking this test! I always get the same response and it accurately describes my personality type! Thanks for the link to help write a paper for my healthcare leadership course!
Jung personality types
3 Friday, 29 June 2012 11:15
Suej
Last time I did this profile assessment was in 2006, interesting to find that I have not moved away from the origional ENFJ!

Like your site and take on things.
Add your comment


The word for verification. Lowercase letters only with no spaces.

In Section: Mind tool box - This article belongs to category: Self tests

Mind quotes

An optimist is the human personification of spring.

Susan J. Bissonette


Newsletter

Your email will not be sold, rented out or abused. canspam


Register

Nutritional content tables

Nutritional content tables    Find out how much calories, protein, carbs, cholesterol, vitamins and minerals your food contains.

Nutritional calculators

Nutritional calculators          How much food you need? What is your Body Mass Index (BMI), Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) and Body fat.

Depression test

Zung depression self test.         If you want to self assess your mood and you suspect you may be depressed take this test.

Glycemic index and load

Glycemic index and load table.           For both glycemic index and glycemic load the lower the better.

Metabolic type self test

Metabolic type self test Proteins, carbohydrates, or both?        What is good for you?